About

Oblivious Artefacts

visual art and much more. We are a collective working in Roma, Palermo, Berlin.
www.obliviousartefacts.com

Bio
Oblivious is a visual experiment, a collaboration between Ignazio Mortellaro and Rosanna Costantino. United by their common interest in video and photography their practice is informed both by their academic training in Architecture and Building Engineering and by their professional experience of architectural practice, as well as urban analysis and design. Their work explores the dynamics between people and the use of space, and the interaction of natural and fabricated environments.
The medium of video acts as a tool for investigating the perception of images, invoking moods that range from the surreal to the objective. Technology is kept to a minimum and technical restriction is imposed in order to release creativity. Mortellaro and Costantino take influence from early C20th experimental cinema where utterly iconic imagery was created despite huge technological constraints. Each Oblivious VJ set or AV performance involves the use of original material and forms an ongoing research into human anatomy and landscapes.
In 2010 Oblivious became a collective. The project now involves other artists, designers and practitioners working in Berlin, Rome and Palermo, including the visual artist Marco Morici, the graphic designer Glauco Marino, the photographer José Florentino and the sound designer Luca Mortellaro. Oblivious have also worked with outstanding underground labels, including Prologue, Meerestief and Lineal Records.
2010 sees Oblivious join the Stroboscopic Artefacts family, a Berlin based techno label where they are the resident graphic designers; realising the entire design concepts from 12” artwork to video teasers to VJ sets.

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giovannamarascia:

.
Preview di 6 foto della serie.
Canon AE1. Pellicola Ilford FP4. 

giovannamarascia:

.

Preview di 6 foto della serie.

Canon AE1. Pellicola Ilford FP4. 


(via giovannamarascia)

Carla Accardi, Rosso scuro (1974)

Carla Accardi, Rosso scuro (1974)


(via whitehotel)
jflorentino:

Ignazio Mortellaro lavorando alla scultura “ossidiana”, realizzata in ‘ocasione della mostra con lo stesso nome. 
—
© José Florentino
Roma, 2011
Senza titolo 

jflorentino:

Ignazio Mortellaro lavorando alla scultura “ossidiana”, realizzata in ‘ocasione della mostra con lo stesso nome. 

© José Florentino

Roma, 2011

Senza titolo 


(via jflorentino)
nudeartgallery:

kishin Shinoyama

nudeartgallery:

kishin Shinoyama


(via nudeartgallery)
jflorentino:

Ignazio Mortellaro working on his project “Terrae Motus”, at Filicudi Island. 
—
© Jose Florentino
Filicudi 2012
Terrae Motus #2

jflorentino:

Ignazio Mortellaro working on his project “Terrae Motus”, at Filicudi Island. 

© Jose Florentino

Filicudi 2012

Terrae Motus #2


(via jflorentino)
jflorentino:

© José Florentino
Filicudi 2011
senza titolo 

jflorentino:

© José Florentino

Filicudi 2011

senza titolo 


(via jflorentino)
jflorentino:

Tony Gatlif, soprannominato “il regista militante”, noto per Exils (migliore regia canes 2004) e Gadjo dilo (Lo straniero pazzo).
—
© José Florentino
Roma 2012
Tony Gatlif

jflorentino:

Tony Gatlif, soprannominato “il regista militante”, noto per Exils (migliore regia canes 2004) e Gadjo dilo (Lo straniero pazzo).

© José Florentino

Roma 2012

Tony Gatlif


(via jflorentino)
jflorentino:

Ignazio Mortellaro e la sua nuova opera, un’installazione intitolata “Terrae Motus”.
—
© José Florentino
Roma, 2012
Terrae Motus

jflorentino:

Ignazio Mortellaro e la sua nuova opera, un’installazione intitolata “Terrae Motus”.


© José Florentino

Roma, 2012

Terrae Motus


(via jflorentino)


Lichtfeld_Sebastian Hempel

(Source: pandamandium)

new serie Stellate for SA by Ignazio Mortellaro and Marco Morici [Oblivious Artefacts] 
Stellate 1 marks the start of the Stellate Series: sounds gathered from the experimental frontiers and outer edges of electronic music. For every Stellate release four producers have each created two tracks. The eight resulting tracks highlight four unique minds and the disparate sounds that gravitate together at the periphery.
SASTE001 brings together the visions of Lucy, Borful Tang, Perc and Kevin Gorman: yet as diverse as the forms and textures that they use are, something intangible provides a sense of unity. Stellate 1 taps into the place where electronic music-making began. It delves into a liminal Post-War atmosphere where the very fabric of society was being completely re-thought and composers dug into dissonance to explore the essence of making it new.
Lucy references this Modernist legacy with track titles taken from Beckett’s bowler hat clad characters in ‘Waiting For Godot’, a play where nothing happens, twice. In Lucy’s hands ‘Estragon’ and ‘Vladimir’ are transported forwards to the point where Post-War becomes Post-Riot and where Post-Modernism trickles into nothing more that the Post-Millennium. The optimism of 2000 has faded giving way to a slump where we wait impatiently for Godot.
Post post-prefixes you’ll find Borful Tang. ‘Meet The Band’ and ‘The Seduction Ends In Tears’ are somewhere between eyebrow raising and brow furrowing. Oblique to the nth degree and processed into another era the tracks are populated by haunting presences. Created entirely from the debris of the C20th, Borful Tang extracts droning, stuttering dialoguesand remembered conversations that are filled only with regrets.
Distancing himself from his instinctively physical approach to music, Perc’s ‘Paris’ and ‘Molineux’ lay aside the mores of the dance floor. This is not music that you recognize, categorize and listen to passively: these tracks demand an audience with your inner ear. Perc becomes a sort of flâneur free to draw strained, eerie conclusions from his experience of the urban landscape. ‘Paris’ is a bleak landscape of back streets and side alleys and ‘Molineux’ sketches the fleeting reverberations of the avant-garde.
'Frequency Phase Parts I and II' and 'Frequency Phase Part III' refer to Steve Reich's late 1960's
phasing experiments. Kevin Gorman is preoccupied with augmenting sounds, sounds that stem from the blissful utopia that the future promised. Elegant strings soundtrack the political ideals that nations are founded upon, only to be overridden by grating samples from a leader of the supposedly free world. His subtext, his call to make it new does not solely concern itself with aesthetic or musical structures, but also political agendas.
The Stellate Series is boxed exquisitely in circular metallic tins which contains two transparent 10” vinyls. Each vinyl is separated by a typographic print on recycled paper. The Stellate releases also contain a hand-numbered artwork inlay by Ignazio Mortellaro and Marco Morici [Oblivious Artefacts]. The entire artwork is comprised of four parts which are divided between Stellate 1 to Stellate 4.
Additionally every release contains a card with a unique download code. Each Stellate release is a strictly limited edition of 300. The entire Stellate Series was craftily mastered in Berlin at the Artefacts Mastering Studio.
Words: Clare Molloy

new serie Stellate for SA by Ignazio Mortellaro and Marco Morici [Oblivious Artefacts] 

Stellate 1 marks the start of the Stellate Series: sounds gathered from the experimental frontiers and outer edges of electronic music. For every Stellate release four producers have each created two tracks. The eight resulting tracks highlight four unique minds and the disparate sounds that gravitate together at the periphery.

SASTE001 brings together the visions of Lucy, Borful Tang, Perc and Kevin Gorman: yet as diverse as the forms and textures that they use are, something intangible provides a sense of unity. Stellate 1 taps into the place where electronic music-making began. It delves into a liminal Post-War atmosphere where the very fabric of society was being completely re-thought and composers dug into dissonance to explore the essence of making it new.

Lucy references this Modernist legacy with track titles taken from Beckett’s bowler hat clad characters in ‘Waiting For Godot’, a play where nothing happens, twice. In Lucy’s hands ‘Estragon’ and ‘Vladimir’ are transported forwards to the point where Post-War becomes Post-Riot and where Post-Modernism trickles into nothing more that the Post-Millennium. The optimism of 2000 has faded giving way to a slump where we wait impatiently for Godot.

Post post-prefixes you’ll find Borful Tang. ‘Meet The Band’ and ‘The Seduction Ends In Tears’ are somewhere between eyebrow raising and brow furrowing. Oblique to the nth degree and processed into another era the tracks are populated by haunting presences. Created entirely from the debris of the C20th, Borful Tang extracts droning, stuttering dialoguesand remembered conversations that are filled only with regrets.

Distancing himself from his instinctively physical approach to music, Perc’s ‘Paris’ and ‘Molineux’ lay aside the mores of the dance floor. This is not music that you recognize, categorize and listen to passively: these tracks demand an audience with your inner ear. Perc becomes a sort of flâneur free to draw strained, eerie conclusions from his experience of the urban landscape. ‘Paris’ is a bleak landscape of back streets and side alleys and ‘Molineux’ sketches the fleeting reverberations of the avant-garde.

'Frequency Phase Parts I and II' and 'Frequency Phase Part III' refer to Steve Reich's late 1960's

phasing experiments. Kevin Gorman is preoccupied with augmenting sounds, sounds that stem from the blissful utopia that the future promised. Elegant strings soundtrack the political ideals that nations are founded upon, only to be overridden by grating samples from a leader of the supposedly free world. His subtext, his call to make it new does not solely concern itself with aesthetic or musical structures, but also political agendas.

The Stellate Series is boxed exquisitely in circular metallic tins which contains two transparent 10” vinyls. Each vinyl is separated by a typographic print on recycled paper. The Stellate releases also contain a hand-numbered artwork inlay by Ignazio Mortellaro and Marco Morici [Oblivious Artefacts]. The entire artwork is comprised of four parts which are divided between Stellate 1 to Stellate 4.

Additionally every release contains a card with a unique download code. Each Stellate release is a strictly limited edition of 300. The entire Stellate Series was craftily mastered in Berlin at the Artefacts Mastering Studio.

Words: Clare Molloy

thewiremagazine:


Stellate 1
(Stroboscopic Artefacts)

Double 10” release in an edition of 300, as a showcase for Lucy’s (aka 
Luca Mortellaro) Stroboscopic Artefacts label. Two clear 10” records in a foam lined metal tin, with two paper slips for credits and track listings. Artwork by Ignazio Mortellaro and Marco Morici at Oblivious Artefacts.

jflorentino:

(e perche tutte le foto hanno una storia…)
Dopo giorni di “clausura forzata” in una villa fuori Roma, Ignazio Mortellaro, accompagnato dalla curatrice della mostra, Cornelia Mattiacci e Marco Morici, in compagnia di Chiara Romano (una delle curatrici della ultima mostra di Yves Saint Laurent a Madrid), tornano in città nella vigilia della vernissage della mostra alla CO2, del gallerista Giorgio Galotti (alla sinistra nella foto).
—
© Jose Florentino 
Roma 2011
Pre-Ossidiana

jflorentino:

(e perche tutte le foto hanno una storia…)

Dopo giorni di “clausura forzata” in una villa fuori Roma, Ignazio Mortellaro, accompagnato dalla curatrice della mostra, Cornelia Mattiacci e Marco Morici, in compagnia di Chiara Romano (una delle curatrici della ultima mostra di Yves Saint Laurent a Madrid), tornano in città nella vigilia della vernissage della mostra alla CO2, del gallerista Giorgio Galotti (alla sinistra nella foto).

© Jose Florentino 

Roma 2011

Pre-Ossidiana


(via jflorentino)
maxxi [rome] . ignazio mortellaro

maxxi [rome] . ignazio mortellaro

gego . reticularea .1969

gego . reticularea .1969